Pilgrimage of the Magi, by Earl Edward Sanborn

Creator: Earl Edward Sanborn [1890-1937]
Date: 1920s(?)
Dimensions: 34 inches in diameter
Date Acquired: 2016-04-30
From Where?: Atlanta, Georgia (Ahlers & Ogletree Auction Gallery)

This explains better than I could why Earl Edward Sanborn was inspired by 13th century techniques:

Despite technical limitations, thirteenth century glass has never been equaled in quality of design or beauty of color. The metallic ores used by the medieval craftsman to color the glass were crude and impure but nonetheless produced amazing varieties of color. The glass, although capable of being made only in small pieces, none larger than the palm of a man’s hand, gives by this very fact a jewel-like quality to the windows. The uneven and varying thicknesses of the small pieces of glass breaks the light coming through the windows into irregular and scintillating refractions of color. The leads which joined the pieces of glass were well organized, adjusted to the article of window design, and formed an integral part of it. In later centuries when the techniques of glass making were improved, many of these assets of medieval glass, imposed actually by technical limitations, vanished. By the sixteenth century, when glass could be made in large sheets, when the entire design could be painted with enamel colors onto the glass, the mosaic technique of the medieval widows was entirely supplanted and the true art of stained glass became extinct.

Source: http://college.holycross.edu/RaguinStainedGlassInAmerica/Gothic/Gothic.html

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